Obama Loses Support Among Christians

by Benjamin Domenech on 9:45 am February 22, 2010

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According to the latest report issued from The Barna Group, the best analytical group out there when it comes to faith issues, the 40% of President Obama’s support that came from born-again Christians in 2008 has diminished rapidly, particularly among evangelicals:

Most Americans are not satisfied with the job the president is doing…The picture is less rosy when looking at the ratings given to the president by committed Christians. Among evangelicals, only 18% are satisfied (just 6% are “completely satisfied”) while 69% are dissatisfied (including 38% who are “completely dissatisfied”). Among all born again Christians – one-fifth of whom are evangelicals and four-fifths of whom are not – the ratings are not quite as scathing, but are notably worse than those provided by non-Christian adults: 35% are satisfied and 36% are dissatisfied. Among adults who are not born again the president fares much better, with such people twice as likely to be satisfied as dissatisfied (48% satisfied, 24% are not).

My question would be: what is it that President Obama has done that has resulted in this downturn? He hasn’t been particularly aggressive on social issues at all as president, with the exception of the Mexico City reversal on abortion — but he’s left it to Nancy Pelosi, primarily, to carry water for taxpayer funding. He has not applied particularly leftist social policy toward faith based funding, nor has he taken a strong stand on same sex marriage issues beyond a few remarks here and there — as on the Don’t Ask Don’t Tell issue (he could’ve made that decision on day one) he seems to want to maximize his political benefit even if he doesn’t actually achieve anything. His approach to education policy (an issue Christians care about more than almost any other, though it tends to get ignored in the MSM) has been muted thus far. What’s the big thing angering evangelical Christians — Sonia Sotomayor?

Perhaps this is an example of Christian voters being, essentially, no different than other voters in outlook — only in what they prioritize.

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